Warszawa / Ochota / 13 Jesionowa Street
  • House at 13 Jesionowa Street, 2017, photo: A. Barański, Pańska Skórka

  • House at 13 Jesionowa Street, 2017, photo: A. Barański, Pańska Skórka

  • House at 13 Jesionowa Street, 2017, photo: A. Barański, Pańska Skórka

  • Maria Jabłońska, 1942, photo: family archive, POLIN Museum

  • Maria Jabłońska in the garden at 13 Jesionowa Street, Warsaw, 1943, photo: family archive, POLIN Museum

  • Janusz Jabłoński, photo: family archive, POLIN Museum

  • Janusz Jabłoński, Warsaw, 2016, photo: M. Szczepaniak, POLIN Museum

Maria Jabłońska

The villa with access to the garden was considered a safe place. „We […] rented the first and second floors,” recalled Janusz Jabłoński, Maria’s son, who was 16 at the time. “The person we took care of occupied a little room on the second floor. […] A hideout was arranged behind the chimney, right below the roof – he kept his food and water there, used it as a toilet, etc.”

Maria Jabłońska met the Grossmans in 1942. They had not moved into the ghetto; instead, they rented a flat under a false name Jedlicki. Following their denouncement, Ms Jabłońska took them to Jesionowa Street in the Staszic Colony. After several days, for the sake of safety, the parents and their two sons split up. Only the father remained in the villa.

“Mr Jedlicki was the king of the kitchen, as he was the one to brew soap,” Janusz recalled their joint work. “We became close friends while working on the soap. […] I knew I could come to him and ask for help in maths – my parents never helped me with homework.”

Maria spoke French and English; she worked at the radio intercept preparing reports for the Information Bulletin. She was friends with Zofia Kossak and cooperated with ‘Żegota’ Council to Aid Jews. Her son served as her courier. She died of cancer in 1943.