Warszawa / Śródmieście / 75 Nowogrodzka Street
  • Father Boduen Children’s Home, 75 Nowogrodzka Street, photo: K. Jackl, POLIN Museum

  • Father Boduen Children’s Home, 75 Nowogrodzka Street, photo: A. Barański, Pańska Skórka

  • Władysław and Jan Marynowski, photo: family archive, POLIN Museum

  • Władysława Marynowska’s wartime ID, photo: family archive, POLIN Museum

  • Irena Sendler, photo: family archive, POLIN Museum

  • Memorial plaque at the façade of Father Boduen Children’s Home, 75 Nowogrodzka Street, photo: K. Jackl, POLIN Museum

Władysława Marynowska (Boduen's Home)

Father Boduen’s Children’s Home, an orphanage for abandoned children, was affiliated with the Warsaw division of Health and Social Services Department. Since 1939, Dr Maria Prokopowicz-Wierzbowska was its manager. Władysława Marynowska was one of the carers.

During the war, the Home accepted Jewish children as well. As long as there was free access to and out of the ghetto, parents themselves would bring their children to the Home. There were also children brought in by Polish carers, fearing the punishment awaiting them for helping Jews.

After the ghetto had been sealed, social workers engaged in rescue. Irena Sendlerowa, Helena Szeszko or Irena Schultz used to lead children out of the ghetto. Irena Schultz initiated cooperation with Ms Marynowska. Details regarding transfer of children were discussed using a code. Marynowska looked for foster homes for children with prominently Semitic look. It happened that Home’s employees, including Marynowska, took the children in their care to their own homes.

The majority of children was not registered. They were often given names of deceased people. The caretakers made sure to keep the children’s true personal data. They were convinced that by doing so they would enable the parents to reconnect with their children after the war.

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